Philodendron ‘Prince of Orange’ Care Guide (2022)

philo prince of orange

Philodendron Prince of Orange is a modern philodendron hybrid that is nothing short of spectacular.

Its gorgeous orange, chartreuse, and green leaves create a vivid tapestry of color, perfect to add a vibrant splash of the tropics in any space.

Compact in size, it will fit just about anywhere.

Scientific NamePhilodendron ‘Prince of Orange’
Common NamePrince of Orange, Orange Prince
LightBright indirect sunlight
WateringWater if the top inch of soil is dry
Temperature65 to 80ºF (18 to 27ºC)
Hardiness Zone10 to 12
Humidity50% and higher
Soil TypeRich, quick-draining, loamy
Soil pH6.0 to 7.0 (mildly acidic to neutral)
FertilizingA balanced feed once a month in spring and summer
RepottingEvery 1 to 2 years
PruningTo remove dead or damaged leaves
PropagationStem cuttings or air layering
ToxicityToxic to humans and pets
Mature Size2 feet as a houseplant
Bloom TimeSpring

What’s Unique About Philodendron Prince of Orange?

The Philodendron Prince of Orange plant has never grown in the wild, as it is a modern hybrid first patented in 1989.

However, it retains the main characteristics of its wild philodendron ancestors, which are native to the tropical rainforests of the Caribbean and Central and South America.

Philodendron Prince of Orange plants are a favorite of indoor gardeners because of their uniquely colored leaves. 

They are bright orange when they first unfurl, morphing to apricot and then chartreuse before maturing to medium green.

Growing Philodendron Prince of Orange is easy, making it a great choice for both new and experienced gardeners.

Philodendron Prince of Orange Care

The philodendron family originates in the tropical rainforest, where the various cultivars grow on the forest floor or scramble up the tall trees.

While they thrive in this hot, humid, shady environment, you will find that Philodendron Prince of Orange plant care is easy to achieve.

Prince of Orange plant care, briefly summarized, is about keeping it moist, warm, and out of the bright sun.

Light 

In the rainforest, the punishing rays of the tropical sun are filtered through the leaves of the tree canopy.

Philodendron Prince of Orange light requirements are for bright but indirect light, or between 10,000 to 20,000 lux.

If you live in a temperate zone where winter days are short, consider investing in a grow light to make sure it gets at least 8 hours of light a day.

Otherwise, you should be able to meet your Prince of Orange plant light needs by setting it next to a north or east window.

In a south or west-facing room, find a spot in the room where it is out of the full sun, as that will damage the Philodendron Prince of Orange’s leaves.

Watering 

In the rainforests where philodendrons evolved, they are accustomed to soil that drains excess water away, but still retains a fair amount of moisture. Philodendron Prince of Orange has the same watering needs.

Your Philodendron Prince of Orange watering schedule should not be etched in stone, but rather you should respond to the level of soil moisture.

If the top surface is damp, leave it alone. If it’s dry, stick in your finger. Once the first inch or so has dried out, it’s time to water Prince of Orange plant.

Slowly pour tepid water over the whole surface until it’s been absorbed. 

Temperature 

The Philodendron Prince of Orange temperature range is from 65 to 80ºF (18 to 27ºC). 

Since most modern homes have central heating, any indoor space should easily provide an adequate temperature for Prince of Orange plant.

Of course, the higher end of the temperature range can really boost growth. Even in a temperate climate, you can usually move your Philodendron Prince of Orange outdoors to bask in the hot and humid summer weather.

However, indoors or out, make sure that the temperature stays above 55 ºF (13ºC). Below that level, Philodendron Prince of Orange’s temperature tolerance drops off drastically.

Make sure it’s not left in a draft or near an air conditioning unit. Never expose it to freezing temperatures, as it has no frost hardiness.

Humidity 

The rainforest is, of course, a humid environment, and even though Philodendron Prince of Orange has never grown there, it loves moist air.

Philodendron Prince of Orange humidity requirements are 50% or more. Basically, the higher the better. 

To provide the ideal humidity for Prince of Orange plant without turning your home into a sauna, you need to create a microclimate with a higher humidity level.

Just grouping all your plants together can go a long way towards that goal, but adding pebble trays filled with water under the pots will also help.

Even better, buy a small humidifier to tuck in the middle of your indoor tropical garden.

Soil 

Your Philodendron Prince of Orange soil needs to both drain well and retain moisture.

This is not as contradictory as it seems; in the rainforest, philodendrons grow in a spongy soil full of organic matter.

A good pH level for Prince of Orange plant is 6.0 to 7.0, or mildly acidic to neutral.

You can use a commercial aroid soil for Prince of Orange plant, but it’s not necessary to buy a specialty soil mix.

You can successfully grow your Philodendron Prince of Orange in 100% peat moss, or a mix of equal parts peat moss and perlite.

Fertilizer 

You should use some Philodendron Prince of Orange fertilizer, but too much will hurt the plant, not help it.

The easiest fertilizer for Prince of Orange plant is to add a good handful of compost or worm castings when you repot. That will slowly release its nutrients over time. 

Then, every spring that you don’t repot, add some to the surface of the soil. 

Otherwise, you can use a liquid formulation with a balanced fertilizer ratio of 5-5-5. 

Dilute it to half strength, and slowly pour it over the whole soil surface, shortly after you’ve watered.

Do this once a month in spring and summer.

Potting & Repotting 

It’s best to plan on Philodendron Prince of Orange repotting once every year or two, especially if the roots start filling its current pot.

Repotting Prince of Orange plant should be done not only to give a rootbound plant more room to grow, but also to give it fresh potting soil to grow in.

As well, these plants can become top-heavy and may need a larger planter to balance the weight of the leaves.

Don’t go up more than one pot size at a time, and use a substantial clay or pottery container to provide plenty of ballast. Make sure it’s got a drainage hole or two.

Pruning 

You will not have to do much Philodendron Prince of Orange pruning, as it has been bred to grow into a compact clump with an attractive shape.

Of course, you will need to trim off dead or damaged leaves, and not just to maintain your Philodendron Prince of Orange’s good looks. Dying or injured foliage can harbor disease and attract pests.

When cutting Prince of Orange plant, always wear gloves and don’t get the irritating sap on your skin.

The best way to ensure a good shape for your Philodendron Prince of Orange is by rotating the pot a quarter turn every time you water. 

This will prevent it from growing lop-sided as it reaches towards the brightest light. 

Propagation 

Philodendron Prince of Orange propagation is easy to do, and since its patent expired in 2008, you can legally make and sell new plants.

To propagate Prince of Orange plant from stem cuttings, cut a stem just below a leaf node. 

Place the cutting either in a moist growing medium or a jar of water. Keep it moist and warm, and if in water, change it every few days. Within about a month you should see roots.

The other method is by air layering the plantlets around the base of the mother plant. 

When you see new shoots with aerial roots forming, make a small cut just below a node.

Wrap damp peat moss around it and cover it with a plastic bag. Within a few weeks it should have developed roots.

Also, make sure to check out our in-depth Philodendron rojo congo plant care guide.

Common Problems of Philodendron Prince of Orange

There are very few Philodendron Prince of Orange problems, which is one of the reasons this is such a great plant to grow.

Most potential problems with Prince of Orange plant will be avoided by growing your plant under its ideal conditions.

Keeping an eye on the gorgeous Philodendron Prince of Orange leaves can give you an early heads-up that there’s an issue to solve.

Pests 

You will not have to worry about many Philodendron Prince of Orange pests.

You’ll have even fewer bugs on your Prince of Orange plant if you wipe down the leaves regularly with insecticidal soap or neem oil.

If some bugs do turn up, you should be able to get rid of them easily.

Scale insects look like small brown bumps on stems and leaves. Scrape them off carefully.

Mealybugs will congregate under the leaves in white, fuzzy clumps. Wipe them away using a cotton ball soaked in rubbing alcohol.

Spider mites leave tell-tale yellow bumps on the leaves, and sometimes spin their sticky webs. Take your Philodendron Prince of Orange to the shower or sink and rinse all surfaces off thoroughly.

Diseases 

Good news! The Prince of Orange plant was bred to be resistant to bacterial leaf rot and fungal leaf spot, two of the worst problems for tropical plants.

However, there are a few Philodendron Prince of Orange diseases that you may encounter.

Root rot will develop when the soil is kept too wet and the roots can’t breathe. You will see leaves turning yellow, stems getting soft, and roots turning black and smelly. Cut out all infected parts and repot it in fresh soil after disinfecting the pot.

Powdery mildew can get established in warm, humid conditions. Cut off affected leaves and give your Philodendron Prince of Orange a good spray with a teaspoon of baking soda in a quart of water. Improve air circulation around the plant to prevent a recurrence.

Growing Problems 

Other Philodendron Prince of Orange growing problems can be the result of poor growing conditions. Fixing the cause can cure your sick plant.

Dark patches can indicate tissue damage from exposure to cold temperatures. Make sure your Philodendron Prince of Orange isn’t too close to a cold window or sitting in a draft.

Crispy edges probably mean you’re not watering frequently enough. 

Pale leaves are a symptom of not enough light for your Philodendron Prince of Orange. Move it to a brighter spot.

Brown leaf tips are usually a sign of low humidity, so increase the moisture level in the air.

Toxicity of Philodendron Prince of Orange

The Prince of Orange plant is toxic to humans and animals.

Its toxicity is caused by the calcium oxalate crystals that permeate all parts of the plant, including the sap.

However, with reasonable precautions you should be able to share your home with Philodendron Prince of Orange, children, and pets.

For Humans 

While Philodendron Prince of Orange is toxic to humans, a life-threatening incident after exposure is extremely rare. 

Children are more at risk than adults, because they sometimes simply don’t understand what they can and cannot eat. 

They’re unlikely to do more than take a nibble, since they will immediately experience the pain of being pierced by the tiny crystals. 

Get them to rinse and spit, and give them something cool and soothing to ease the pain.

However, if they have a swollen tongue or difficulty breathing, take them to the emergency room.

Adults are more likely to get sap on their skin while cutting the plant. Rinse it off well to stop any rash from developing.

For Pets 

Philodendron Prince of Orange is toxic to all pets, including dogs, cats, and rabbits, all of whom have been known to chow down on houseplants.

If your pet starts foaming at the mouth, vomiting, or wheezing, you should get them to the veterinarian as soon as possible. Permanent internal damage is possible in severe cases.

It’s better to prevent such an outcome by finding a good spot for your Philodendron Prince of Orange out of reach of potential leaf munchers.

Since it’s not going to get taller than 2 feet, it’s easy to find an elevated position in most rooms. Either a high ledge or table, or a kitchen or bathroom counter should be sufficient.

Philodendron Prince of Orange Appearance

The Philodendron Prince of Orange appearance is absolutely dazzling. The rich, vibrant colors of the leaves create a varied tapestry.

Its compact size and natural bushy rosette form make it a perfect accent plant in a variety of settings from traditional to contemporary.

In addition, you may even get to see your Prince of Orange plant flower.

Foliage 

The foliage of Philodendron Prince of Orange has made it an extremely desirable houseplant ever since it was introduced.

When a leaf first unfurls, it is a vibrant, bright orange. It then transforms to an apricot shade, then yellow, chartreuse, and finally olive green. 

As the evergreen leaves emerge on an ongoing basis, you can expect to see the full range of foliage colors all at the same time on one plant for a truly spectacular show.

The thick, leathery leaves have a glossy surface. They will grow to 14 inches long and 8 inches across, in an oval shape. 

Flowering 

It is not uncommon to see your Philodendron Prince of Orange flowering in spring, but blooming is not the reason for growing this outstanding foliage plant.

The small white flowers can be pleasant to see, but they have no scent, and you may find that they detract from the overall impact of the foliage.

It is perfectly okay to cut off the flower spikes as they emerge. That way, your Philodendron Prince of Orange can instead concentrate its energies on growing more gorgeous leaves.

If you do let the flowers bloom, be sure to cut them off when they have faded.

Size and Growth 

The full size of Philodendron Prince of Orange grown indoors is about 2 feet tall with a spread of 3 feet. A plant grown outdoors in a tropical zone could get up to 3 feet tall.

It has a fairly rapid growth rate, with new plants getting to 18 to 20 inches tall within their first year.

The Philodendron Prince of Orange is a true rosette without a central stem. It naturally forms into a bushy clump without any grooming and does not require any support.

New leaves emerge from the center base, so the colorful young leaves are framed by the older green leaves around the edge.

Philodendron Prince of Orange Fragrance

There is no Philodendron Prince of Orange fragrance. Even the occasional spring flowers have no scent, and the evergreen foliage is fragrance-free.

However, your indoor air will benefit from growing a Philodendron Prince of Orange. 

Like all philodendrons, its foliage filters out contaminants such as formaldehyde, which is used in everything from fabric treatments to carpeting.

As well, you may prefer a scentless plant in your home, especially if you have some sensitivities to strong fragrances.

If you do have a preference for some pleasant smells with your plants, try adding a drop or two of essential oil to the solution you use to clean the leaves.

Suggested Uses for Philodendron Prince of Orange

There aren’t many places where a Philodendron Prince of Orange wouldn’t look great.

With its compact size and easy maintenance, it will fit into even a relatively small indoors space.

If you have room in your bathroom to place this beauty, it will love the extra humidity. 

As a part of an indoor tropical garden, its vibrantly colored leaves will stand out from the rest.

Outdoors on a deck or patio, you can use it as part of your summer decor.

If you’re in a tropical zone, you can also plant Philodendron Prince of Orange in the ground, in a shady spot where it can thrive.

FAQ

What is Philodendron Prince of Orange? 

Philodendron Prince of Orange is a recently developed hybrid cultivar in the Philodendron family. It is an evergreen tender perennial that is grown as a houseplant.

How to identify Philodendron Prince of Orange? 

Philodendron Prince of Orange has large leaves ranging in color from bright orange to apricot to chartreuse to olive green, growing on a compact bushy plant.

How to care for Philodendron Prince of Orange? 

Philodendron Prince of Orange should be grown in a warm, humid environment indoors or outside, planted in moist, well-draining soil, and kept out of the full sun.

How to grow Philodendron Prince of Orange indoors? 

Philodendron Prince of Orange is grown indoors as a potted plant in porous soil with regular watering and fertilizing, in warm temperatures and high humidity.

How to grow Philodendron Prince of Orange outdoors? 

Philodendron Prince of Orange can be planted in the ground in tropical zones, or moved out to a shady location for the summer in temperate regions.

How fast does Philodendron Prince of Orange grow? 

Philodendron Prince of Orange has a fast growth rate, and within a year can already be 20 inches tall with a spread of 36 inches.

How tall does Philodendron Prince of Orange grow? 

Philodendron Prince of Orange can reach a full height of 2 feet with a spread of 3 feet when grown indoors, and 3 feet tall outdoors.

How to make Philodendron Prince of Orange grow faster? 

Philodendron Prince of Orange will grow at an optimal pace when it is nurtured in very warm temperatures with very high humidity, and watered and fertilized regularly.

How to stake Philodendron Prince of Orange? 

Philodendron Prince of Orange naturally forms a bushy rosette without a central stem, so there is no need to stake it. It will not lean if the pot is rotated weekly.

How to pot Philodendron Prince of Orange? 

Philodendron Prince of Orange should be planted in a heavy clay pot with drainage holes, using a loose, porous soil high in organic matter that retains moisture. 

How to revive Philodendron Prince of Orange? 

If your Philodendron Prince of Orange has dried out, you need to saturate the soil by placing the pot in a pail of water or full sink.

Why is my Philodendron Prince of Orange dying? 

Your Philodendron Prince of Orange may have root rot, a common fungal disease caused by overwatering. Cut off all infected parts and repot it in fresh soil.

Why is my Philodendron Prince of Orange drooping? 

Your Philodendron Prince of Orange may be overwatered or drying out. Check the soil moisture, and either give it a good soaking or replant it in fresh, porous soil.

How cold can Philodendron Prince of Orange tolerate? 

Philodendron Prince of Orange will suffer foliage damage below 55 ºF (13ºC), and freezing temperatures will kill this tropical plant. Keep it out of drafts.

How to get rid of pests on Philodendron Prince of Orange? 

Philodendron Prince of Orange pests can be prevented by wiping down the leaves once a month with an organic insecticide solution such as insecticidal soap or neem oil.

Is Philodendron Prince of Orange toxic to cats? 

Yes, Philodendron Prince of Orange is toxic to cats. The calcium oxalate crystals can cause vomiting or wheezing, and your cat will need veterinary care.

Is Philodendron Prince of Orange toxic to dogs? 

Yes, Philodendron Prince of Orange is toxic to dogs. If your dog starts vomiting, wheezing or drooling excessively, take it to the veterinarian at once.

Is Philodendron Prince of Orange toxic to children? 

Yes, Philodendron Prince of Orange is toxic to children. If your child has a severe reaction including a swollen tongue and constricted airways, take them to the emergency room. 

Is Philodendron Prince of Orange toxic to humans? 

Yes, Philodendron Prince of Orange is toxic to humans. If you get the sap on your skin or in your eyes, flush repeatedly to avoid irritation or pain.

Does Philodendron Prince of Orange have a scent? 

No, Philodendron Prince of Orange does not have a scent. The occasional white flowers have no fragrance, and the evergreen leaves are scentless as well.

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